Audio Abstracts are changing the way scientific research is being communicated. Watch Ernest’s video below where he delves into his article ‘Preseason Adductor Squeeze Strength in 303 Spanish Male Soccer Athletes: A Cross-sectional Study’, highlighting the purpose of the study, its limitations and the practical applications. If you want to read the abstract or access the full paper (where available), all links are below.

The full paper can be found on Researchgate

Ernest can be found on Twitter @EsteveErnest

Abstract: Hip adductor muscle weakness and a history of groin injury both have been identified as strong risk factors for sustaining a new groin injury. Current groin pain and age have been associated with hip adductor strength. These factors could be related, but this has never been investigated. To investigate whether soccer athletes with past-season groin pain and with different durations of past-season groin pain had lower preseason hip adductor squeeze strength compared with those without past-season groin pain. We also investigated whether differences in preseason hip adductor squeeze strength in relation to past-season groin pain and duration were influenced by current groin pain and age. Study design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. In total, 303 male soccer athletes (mean age, 23 ± 4 years; mean weight, 74.0 ± 7.9 kg; mean height, 178.1 ± 6.3 cm) were included in this study. Self-reported data regarding current groin pain, past-season groin pain, and duration were collected. Hip adductor squeeze strength was obtained using 2 different reliable testing procedures: (1) the short-lever (resistance placed between the knees, feet at the examination bed, and 45° of hip flexion) and (2) the long-lever (resistance placed between the ankles and 0° of hip flexion) squeeze tests. There was no difference between those with (n = 123) and without (n = 180) past-season groin pain for hip adductor squeeze strength when adjusting for current groin pain and age. However, athletes with past-season groin pain lasting longer than 6 weeks (n = 27) showed 11.5% and 15.3% lower values on the short-lever (P = .006) and long-lever (P < .001) hip adductor squeeze strength tests, respectively, compared with those without past-season groin pain. Male soccer athletes with past-season groin pain lasting longer than 6 weeks are likely to begin the next season with a high-risk groin injury profile, including a history of groin pain and hip adduction weakness.